Cigarettes and suckers

Cigarettes and suckers


Cigarettes and suckers

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The cigarette does the smoking, the smoker is just the sucker! There are about 4000 chemicals in a cigarette, with no less than 81 cancer-causing ones that have so far been identified. So, isn’t it time to stop smoking?


What it does to you

There’s no doubt, tobacco smoking causes cancer. If we lose the battle against tobacco, we will lose the war against cancer. Within 10 years of stopping smoking, a smoker’s risk of lung cancer falls to about half. Over time, it becomes the same as the risk factor of a non-smoker.

A regular smoker is five times more likely to die of a heart attack in his 40s than a non-smoker of the same age. Within five years of quitting smoking, a smoker’s risk of heart attack falls to about half.

It’s frightening to know that the carbon monoxide in cigarette smoke binds to the haemoglobin molecules in red blood cells far stronger than oxygen can. This reduces the oxygen supply to the brain, causing mental fatigue and lack of concentration.

Smoking can interfere with virtually every aspect of fertility, from ovulation to early development of the embryo. Smoking can slightly lower sperm count and may even contribute to impotence. It also increases the risk of the baby being born prematurely or too small and poses a risk for pregnancy complications and SIDS (sudden infant death syndrome).

Cigarettes are killers that travel in packs. Did you know that each cigarette shortens your life by approximately 12 minutes? The benefits of quitting smoking start immediately. After 20 minutes of quitting smoking, a person’s pulse and blood pressure returns to normal.

A cigarette is the only consumer product which, when used as directed, kills its consumer.

Just quit

“The best way to stop smoking is to just stop − no ifs, ands or butts” (Edith Zittler). Easier said than done? Join a programme to help you stop smoking. You have the best chance of quitting if you are clear in your mind about what you are up against. Educate yourself on the harmful effects of smoking and make a firm decision to terminate its hold on you, your health and your future.

If it initially feels strange to not be holding a cigarette, keep your hands occupied with a coin, a pencil, a paper clip or a marble and replace the cigarette in your mouth with a toothpick, sugar-free chewing gum or a straw.

Sources
Quit smoking. Fedsure Health
www.webmd.com
Your LifeAssist

2017-08-31T18:21:34+00:00